Medical Information delivery – navigating legislation and language

You may remember that I play lacrosse, not well, but with enthusiasm. Last weekend was  a game weekend, the teams played sixes. The teams have thirty seconds to score, then the ball changes hands

It’s fun, it is fast, it needs someone to manage the clock. That was me. Sadly, it was cold, it was raining, and the trackpad on the computer I was using was not registering my frantic taps, or the computer would freeze, or I would lose the window, and as it was not my computer it was tricky. The experience reminded me that even simple tasks can be daunting when you are under pressure to perform, you are not familiar with the material, or you are cold and wet, or in an unfriendly environment. Reminder: when judging substandard performance always consider the context.

Today’s topics:

  • Medical Information delivery – navigating legislation and language
  • Optimising content localisation: balancing global, regional and local requirements
  • The essentials of effective program management
  • Leadership: Diagnose then treat

Medical Information delivery – navigating legislation and language
 
Leading international pharmaceutical firms with a presence in nearly every market typically offer all customer services in the local language(s). However, many mid-sized or smaller companies, particularly those focused on orphan indications,  do not have the resources or global reach necessary to provide every service in every local language.
 
This issue is particularly pronounced in departments like Medical Information, which provide scientific responses to unsolicited queries. Here, the dual requirement for responders to be both scientifically knowledgeable and native speakers significantly compounds the challenge
 
While it is reasonable to anticipate that information provided to customers is provided in local language, this expectation is not widely found in legislation, perhaps because national legislators historically took this for granted.  This absence challenges companies to identify bespoke solutions for each market that are compliant, financially viable and pragmatic, while also meeting customer needs.
 
Solutions to the challenge should consider the business significance of each market, now and in the future and factor in a company’s product portfolio, pipeline, upcoming launches and anticipated market presence and resources.
 
In markets with lower inquiry volumes where scientifically trained native speakers are unavailable for direct customer interactions translation services often bridge the gap. Translators can be utilized to assist on calls, provided stringent quality checks are in place, or queries can be addressed in writing in the local language.
 
Key take-away: A market specific, strategic approach to providing scientific information on medicines to customers in line with codes of conduct and national legislation, as well as business considerations, is important.  Language is just one factor.
 

Optimising content localisation: balancing global, regional, and local requirements
 
“We never use the global materials, because they don’t work in our market” I have heard this many times. The amount of energy expended in generating materials that are not used in local markets is immense. Content is generated, slide kits are shared, yet often, either due to perception or reality, the materials generated by global teams fail to hit the mark.
 
Sometimes this is because global teams operate in a silo, sometimes it is because the needs of smaller markets are not taken into consideration, sometimes it is because speed is in focus and materials are produced in isolation, and sometimes processes describing the adaptation of global materials for use in local markets are not outlined and systems to manage these documents are not implemented.
 
Despite the difficulties in achieving harmonised content, the rationale for centralised generation of content is easy to understand. When it works, there is an increase in efficiency, in effectiveness, a reduction of effort expended in markets, and no reinventing the wheel. With the exception of necessary content adaptations for example to ensure adherence to local legislation and the local label, or in some cases translations of content, local teams can focus on market engagement, instead of on content creation. As customer engagement is led by local teams, and engagement preference varies across markets, the format of content provided by global teams should be flexible to accommodate different audiences, stakeholders, and modalities.

The rationale for a harmonised look and feel across company materials also makes sense as many physicians interact with multiple product teams from the same pharmaceutical firm. Furthermore, especially for companies that are active globally the provision of disparate information from market to market looks unprofessional.
 
While teams often lament the loss of individuality when faced with centralised content generation in reality written content only represents a small part of a relatioship between a pharmaceutical company employee and the stakedholders she engages. ^While “the science is the science” personal engagement, scientific conversations, and relationship management, is provided by individuals hence customers benefit from the best of both worlds a personal touch, individual conversations focused on science and harmonised scientific materials.

Key take-aways: An optimised approach to content benefits all stakeholders, by freeing resource to provide value where it makes a difference

The essentials of effective programme management

Programme management is the coordinated management of multiple projects to achieve the desired outcomes. As the programme lead, you are the conductor of an orchestra. Using this analogy, ensure that everyone in your orchestra knows what instrument they are playing and when. Each section of your orchestra has a leader, for example, the first violin, with responsibility for that section. These are your project managers and sometimes working group leads, depending. Limit the size of working groups so that they remain functional and can make recommendations. Select participants judiciously.

Ensure that everyone’s eyes are on you so that efforts are coordinated. The orchestra is the operational part of your programme. Beyond the operational teams, you also need strategic leadership. The manager of your orchestra, who manages the business aspects of your programme, where you will play next, etc. The strategic team manages the big picture.

In pharma, this means having a steering committee of senior leaders. This is a small team that does not get involved in operational aspects; they are your sounding board, manage other senior stakeholders in the organisation and are accountable for final decisions and the overall direction. While programme management is simple, in theory, often projects gain momentum and complexity, as aspects that were initially forgotten are added in later.

Key takeaway: Effective programme management depends on clear roles, coordination, and strategic oversight to ensure the desired outcomes can be met.

Leadership: Diagnose then treat

 “How many of you in here are CEO’s?” the presenter asked. The video panned to the cowed looking audience, some of whom raised their hands, the presenter said, “you have to be willing to fire your best person, if they are making others unhappy”.

This video is being widely shared and liked on social media.

A word of caution, in my experience, in a dysfunctional team, firing one person, doesn’t solve the underlying problem. It looks easy, but it may not be the right thing to do.

What struck me, more than the presenter’s words, however, was that he was so forceful, that I felt physically uncomfortable just watching a recording of him in my office.

This made me wonder, what if the team leader, or the CEO, is the person everyone is afraid of?  How would you know? Who would tell you? Would you care, and how would you act?

Key take-aways: A leader is also part of a team and influences the team dynamic. Always diagnose then treat.

Reminder, Sign up for the panel discussion  on digital islands and AI on April 24th

Don’t forget to sign up for the panel discussion on digital islands I will be joined by Wolfgang Schwerdt and Peter Shone, both experienced data scientists. All information in the link below.

Sign up for the panel discussion on April 24th at 2 pm GMT, 3 pm CET, and 9 am EST: “Are you stranded on a digital island in a sea of data?”

I hope my blog provides you with useful insights. If  you need support with a project, or are interested in coaching, why not give me a call to see how I can help. Find out what clients say about working with me here link.

My very best wishes

Isabelle C. Widmer MD

Image credit: Isabelle C. Widmer Russia 2006