Data dynamics in medical affairs and sign-up for the panel discussion on digital islands!

The world is a riot of colour, cherry blossoms, crocus, bluebells and daffodils, green shoots, blue skies, and  more hours of sunlight every day. There is a lot of promise in the air. Spring is here, greeted every year with a sense of joy and wonder.

Another event that occurs annually is in preparation: The DIA Medical Information conference, which this year will be held in September in London. Remember, the meeting stays relevant and interesting thanks to your participation. If you have an idea for a submission, please don’t hold back. If you need a pep talk, reach out!

And now some news, something that has not been here before: I will be running and hosting my very first panel discussion with my company. I have done many of these but none without the support of conference staff. Please find the link below!

Today’s blog topics:

  • Medical affairs: unlocking insights and exploring data dynamics 
  • Medical affairs: the benefits of collaboration
  • NEWS: Upcoming panel discussion on digital islands and AI
  • Leadership: Remember to lead with compassion

Medical affairs: unlocking insights and exploring data dynamics 

In 2019, I conducted a survey on the interconnectedness of all things, systems, knowledge, and people in medical affairs. I asked individuals how they manage data, communicate across geographies, and ensure that different teams in the medical affairs sphere, think medical managers, medical directors, medical science liaisons, medical information and beyond, are aware of key information about products, key clients, and services. The survey was global and shared with biotech, pharma, and device manufacturers. Eighty-five respondents shared their knowledge.
 
I asked questions about collaboration across teams and geographies. I inquired about processes, systems, and platforms, as well as whether regular meetings to share data are held and  all processes are described in SOPs and WIS. While almost 50% of respondents reported having meetings to share information across functions, these meetings were mostly on a case-by-case basis, and the approach to information sharing was not described in SOPs and WIS.
 
When asked to identify the biggest challenge to collaboration and data-sharing across teams, respondents selected the following (multiple responses were possible):

  • Lack of knowledge about potential data sharing areas (85% of respondents)
  • Lack of shared processes (90% of respondents)
  • Lack of common platforms (80% of respondents)

 
While AI is often discussed for analysing data within systems, it’s crucial to acknowledge that without proper processes in place to identify and manage data, capitalising on its potential becomes challenging. Furthermore, the absence of common platforms poses a technical obstacle, compounded by variations in taxonomies and ontologies.
In conclusion, many hours are lost in generating new information or reinventing the wheel. With constant reorganisations in the pharmaceutical industry, managing this situation is more important than ever across the board, teams, and geographies.
 
If this topic is of interest to you, stay tuned for a follow-up survey. I am curious to see how the field has evolved.
 
Also, consider signing up for my upcoming panel discussion on digital islands here.
 
Key take-away:
 You don’t know what you don’t know.

Medical affairs: the benefits of collaboration

In the survey mentioned above, beyond asking team leads how they collaborate, what they collaborate on and what processes are in place, I asked them to outline how collaborating across teams, e.g., Medical Directors/Medical Managers, Medical Information, and Medical Science Liaisons, had improved how they work. The precise question was: “What have been the benefits since you started collaborating with other teams?” The answers included: faster identification of issues/opportunities in the markets (65% of respondents), harmonised medical affairs strategy at a local level (63% of respondents), insights from other markets to help us anticipate market needs (58% of respondents), and also, especially relevant in these times of constrained resources, sharing resources has freed up capacity to do other work (41% of respondents).

One respondent said: “From a global perspective, the benefits are better alignment, more efficiency, more room for innovation,” and another stated, “Collaboration helps us anticipate our customers’ information needs.” It is easy to imagine the downstream benefits of these outcomes of better collaboration, for example, better resource management, better customer satisfaction as customers’ needs are anticipated, and enhanced in-field effectiveness, all of which have a positive impact on the business.

Key take-away: cross-team collaboration can add huge value in medical affair through  efficient resource utilisation, reduction of reduplication of efforts and the ability to address topics as they arise ultimately leading to better business outcomes. 

NEWS: Upcoming panel discussion discussion on digital islands and AI

So how about managing data on Jersey then?” a lawyer in the financial sector asked me at a panel discussion I hosted on digital islands last year. Jersey is an island located in the English Channel off the coast of Normandy. I suspect he was disappointed to discover that the islands we focused on were entirely virtual.

I am delighted to share today that I am finally hosting my first virtual panel discussion on digital islands, also virtual, with my company elytra – very real!

I have been speaking at conferences for years, and managed many panel discussions, in this context, but I have always had a hankering to host my own. Now, finally, thanks to Krystal Ellison, who supported me in all things technical, my first panel discussion is here!

I will be joined by Wolfgang Schwerdt and Peter Shone, both experienced data scientists and sailors, so perfectly placed for the subject matter.

Sign up for the panel discussion on April 24th at 2 pm GMT, 3 pm CET, and 9 am EST: Are you stranded on a digital island in a sea of data?”

Come prepared to have all your questions answered.

Key takeaways: My first panel discussion is upcoming, it would be fantastic to see you there.

Leadership: Remember to lead with compassion

During the pandemic, there were many discussions regarding how teams can function without face-to-face interactions and in a state of fear and lock-down. A friend said “I tell my team that not being ok, is ok”.

There were discussions about self- care, how to achieve balance and rituals people put in place to work remotely. The truth of the matter is that many teams work remotely, pandemic or not. However, now the world is back to normal, I anticipate that some of the great ideas people had about managing pressure, or insights about remote working have been lost and forgotten amidst daily work and busy lives.

During the pandemic I put this question to Medical Affairs Leaders  “What has this extreme experience taught you that you are grateful for? How will this knowledge serve you in the future as a leader, or in your personal life?

The five responses I share below are as relevant for today’s world as they were in 2020. regardless of how you are currently engaging with your teams:

  • “Support, empathy and understanding are essential as a manager and be real”
  • “Personal and professional life are intertwined. Each person will react differently as these pieces alter”
  • “To get the best out of people individual circumstances and personalities must be taken account of” 
  • “As someone who would have been a big proponent of a WFH model, I now understand the benefits of working together. I can now also see the importance of trusting your team and giving them flexibility as appropriate to work around their lives”
  • “Some of us may have placed work/company as our driving priority in life. This experience reinforces that professionalism is vital to career success, but relationships outside workplace provide a critical source of connection”

Key take-away: Communication, empathy and trust are crucial when leading teams, regardless of the set-up.  Beyond this, understanding your needs,  striving for balance and self-care are also essential for you to be a strong leader. 

I hope my post provides you with useful insights. If  you need support with a project, or are interested in coaching, why not give me a call to see how I can help. Find out what clients say about working with me here link.


My very best wishes

Isabelle C. Widmer MD